Community Classes Fall 2015

Georgetown University in Qatar is pleased to offer a wide variety of community classes for the public in Qatar. Classes are offered in the evenings from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM and run for six consecutive weeks. 

Classes are open to adult male and female participants over the age of 18. Students who successfully participate in a minimum of five out of six classes will receive a certificate of participation. Please note that these courses are NOT credit-bearing and therefore ineligible for transfer towards any formal degree or program."

More information about Community Classes can be obtained by calling +974 4457 8420, Sunday through Thursday between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM.

Community classes are also offered at Education City by Virginia Commonwealth University Qatar. Please click here to find out more about their program.

Classes listed below are from Fall 2015. New classes for Spring 2016 will be announced in February. 

 

Class Schedule

Introduction to Logic ThinkingReligion, Violence and PeaceIntroduction to Latin American Short StoryPerspectives on Islam and Human RightsUnderstanding Web Mapping and Geolocation        Great Philosophers and Contemporary World Events  Introduction to Ancient and Modern Western ThoughtAnthropological Film

 

 

Introduction to Critical Thinking & Logic
This course introduces logic by studying the characteristics of valid and cogent arguments. The aim is to equip you with the tools with which you can critically examine any piece of reasoning and distinguish good arguments from poor ones. The course will cover the basic elements of two different forms of reasoning: deductive and inductive. Some specific arguments we will study are syllogistic arguments, hypothetical arguments, statistical generalizations and analogical reasoning.
Days: Sunday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Anjana Jacob
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar

 

Religion, Violence and Peace
The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of religiously motivated violence in the world day and the scriptural, historical, political, and psychological dimensions around it. The course will enable students to understand why, how, and when religion becomes violent. It will explore the intertwining of religion and violence from a comparative perspective by giving considerable attention to religiously motivated violence as well as religious resources used for overcoming violence and fostering peace and reconciliation in our contemporary world. The course is divided into three areas of inquiry that are pursued simultaneously: case studies, modalities of religious violence, and religious resources for peace.
Days: Sunday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Akin Akinade
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 

 

Introduction to Latin American Short Story
The course will take students on a tour of the short story in twentieth century Latin American fiction, bringing in a variety of writers from Argentina, Mexico, Colombia and Chile. The stories themselves will cover a range of different genres – including ghost, fantasy and detective genres – and a range of equally different subjects, giving students a more thorough awareness of the political/cultural/social issues of Latin American societies, and a greater familiarity with the region’s literary past.
Days: Sunday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Ian Almond
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 

 

Perspectives on Islam and Human Rights
This course examines the general theme of Islam and human rights. It begins by tracing the evolution and development of modern human rights culture and proceeds with exploring different contemporary Islamic/Muslim discourses on human rights. It surveys the normative Islamic foundations of modern human rights thought as well as the various ways these foundations have been deployed by Muslim intellectuals and actors. It discusses the importance of religion for the cultural legitimacy of human rights and investigates the relationship between religion and culture in several historical and regional contexts. By examining multiple constructions of authority, agency, and legitimacy, the course defies one-sided and unidimensional treatments of this complex issue.
Days: Sunday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Ayman Shabana
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 

 

Understanding Web Mapping and Geolocation
This course introduces students to the concepts of geographic information systems (GIS) and applies this knowledge to the creation, manipulation, and presentation of geospatial data with online mapping technologies and the ArcGIS software platform. Students will learn how to combine data with maps, create maps using various data analysis tools, and acquire an understanding of using online mapping technologies to present data in a geospatial context.
Days: Sunday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Mr. Robert Laws
University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 

 

Understanding Digital Marketing FULL (Registration closed)
This course will teach students how one can utilise the latest digital techniques to market one’s business or personal brand. Students will get a look at the behind-the-scenes advertising tools from companies like Facebook and Google and see how they can be leveraged to maximum effect. Students will able to learn how online tracking works and what can be done to increase digital privacy, understand each of the top digital properties and their strengths and weaknesses, understand usage of digital media to leverage their personal and/or professional reputation, and develop and plan digital promotional campaigns.
Days: Monday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Mr. Nino Kader
​Title: CEO, Spark Digital
 

Great Philosophers and Contemporary World Events **PLEASE NOTE: THIS CLASS STARTS OCTOBER 19TH**
What do the great philosophers of the West teach us about the contemporary challenges we face in the world today? In this class we will read short excerpts from a number of thinkers who shaped—and continue to shape―the way we think about our world today. What is justice? What do we owe God, and what do we owe the state? Under what conditions is improvement possible? What is the source of man’s alienation, and how can it be overcome? What do we mean by modernity? What are the problems of modernity, and how can they be addressed? While the class will focus on specific sections of great books, the course will actually move in three directions at once: inwardly, to the subtleties of the ideas in those books; laterally, to the history of political thought as a whole; and outwardly to the world as we encounter it.
Days: Monday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught byDr. Joshua Mitchell
University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 

 

Introduction to Ancient and Modern Western Thought
The course provides a general introduction to some of the great tracks of western philosophy including epistemology, ethical philosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of history and metaphysics. It is based on the reading of excerpts from authors such as Plato, Kant and Nietzsche. This course offers more than a simple history of ideas- the goal is initiate students to the transformative and practical dimension of philosophy - a dimension that was very clear to the founders of Western Philosophy but that has a tendency to fall into obscurity in today’s times. By the end of the course, students will have familiarised themselves with great names and major philosophical theories and controversies. Most importantly they will realize that in and of itself, the practice of philosophy does not bring about definitive answers, rather more questions about who we are and the reality we live in.
Days: Tuesday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Renaud Fabbri
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar
 


 

Anthropological Film
This course will focus on the most powerful films produced on questions on religion, culture, kinship, marriage, political systems and museum anthropology. Students will be asked to write reflections on the readings and films which will be on Margaret Mead, Franz Boaz, Herbert Spencer, William Rivers, Sir Evans Pritchard and Brownislaw Malowinski covering Native American Studies, American Samoa, Aboriginal Australian Societies, Central Africa, The Himalayas and Papua New Guinea. The objective of the course is to promote an understanding of differences as part and parcel of the human condition by shedding light on problems emanating from intolerance and aversion to differences which have a detrimental impact on the future of humanity as evidenced by events around the world today.
Days: Tuesday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm
Language: English
Taught by: Dr. Rogaia Abusharaf
​University: Georgetown University in Qatar